Effective Date: March 31, 2017
 
Sail Canada
Cruising and Power Standards
Basic Coastal Navigation Standard
©
Sail Canada 2017
BASIC COASTAL NAVIGATION STANDARD
Course Description
This introductory course offers basic knowledge of navigation theory and is the initial course in a
comprehensive set of courses offered by Sail Canada on vessel navigation. The curriculum covers the role of the navigator and introduces the publications, aids to navigation, tools and techniques that support planning and safe passage making. The student is exposed to basic plotting and position determination methods. This course covers information key to the effective use of electronics.
 
Sessions complement material introduced in Sail Canada Basic Cruising and Basic Powerboating courses.
 
The concepts and skills covered will be applied in the Intermediate Cruising and Intermediate Power courses and prepares candidates for the Sail Canada Intermediate Coastal Navigation courses.
This course should be offered and evaluated in not less than 15 hours of classroom sessions.
 
Objective
To be able to plan and to safely navigate by day in Canadian coastal and inland local waters.
 
Prerequisites
None.
PCOC Recommended.
Ashore Knowledge
The candidate must be able to:
1.
Describe the navigator’s role and responsibilities including appraisal, planning, execution and monitoring
position.
2.
Explain the chart symbols and conven
tions on Canadian Hydrographic
charts, in accordance with the ter-
minology of
Chart 1, Symbols, Abbreviations and Terms.
3.
Identify a source of official Canadian government navigation publications.
4.
List the publications required for prudent navigation in the local area and demonstrate their purpose, in-
cluding the following minimum requirements:
a)
Large scale charts of the area and
Chart 1, Symbols, Abbreviations and Terms;
b)
Sailing Directions;
c)
Tide and Current Tables;
d)
Current Atlas;
e)
Collision Regulations;
f)
Local rules and regulations;
g)
List of Lights, Buoys, and Fog Signals;
h)
Radio Aids to Marine Navigation;
i)
Safe Boating Guide;
j)
Canadian Aids to Navigation.
5.
Describe source and purpose of
Notices to Mariners
and
Notices to Shipping.
6.
List and describe or demonstrate the use of tools required for prudent navigation including:
a)
Hand-bearing compass;
b)
Steering compass and deviation table;
c)
Depth sounder and lead line;
d)
Log/knot-meter;
e)
Dividers;
f)
Protractor, plotter or parallel rule;
g)
Watch or clock;
h)
Pencil/eraser/note book.
7.
List factors affecting depth above or below chart datum in tidal and non-tidal waters.
Effective Date: March 31, 2017
Sail Canada
Cruising and Power Standards
Basic Coastal Navigation Standard
©
Sail Canada 2017
8.
Use the
Tide and Current Table, Current Atlas
or chart embedded tables to find:
a)
Times and heights of tides at reference and secondary ports;
b)
Direction and rate of current at
reference and secondary stations;
c)
Rate and direction of current at a specific location using tidal diamonds.or a Current Atlas.
9.
Convert courses, headings and bearings between true, magnetic, and compass.
10.
Plot:
a)
A dead reckoning (DR) position from a kn
own position given speed, time, and course;
b)
A position fix based on two or more bearings on different terrestrial objects taken at one time;
c)
A position fix based on one bearing and a tran
sit range based on terrestrial objects;
d)
Danger and clearing bearings.
11.
Given one or more planned legs and estimated speed, determine to the nearest minute:
a)
Estimated time of arrival (ETA);
b)
Revised ETA.
12.
Recognize day and night appearance and meaning of the Canadian Aids to Navigation System (lat-
eral, cardinal, special
buoys; and daybeacons).
13.
Use charts and publications to prepare a basic
pilotage plan for a daytime trip including:
a)
Harbour entry and exit;
b)
Waypoints, rhumb line course, heading (in compass), distance, and ETA;
c)
Use of aids to navigation enroute;
d)
Consideration of water depth,
current, weather, and othe
r local factors and hazards.
14.
With reference to GPS:
a)
Explain the basic operation of GPS to determine position;
b)
List factors that affect the accuracy of positions given by GPS;
c)
Identify common GPS applications for navigation and cautions concerning their usage.
15.
Describe the types of information that may be included in a vessels log.
16.
Use Sail Canada Uniform Navigation Symbols and Terms for plotting and labelling.
`
Outcomes and Evaluation
You can attain this standard by achieving a minimum of 70% on the Sail Canada Basic Coastal Navigation Ex-
amination. Performance on the written exam
will be reviewed with the candidate.
Successful candidates will be awarded the Basic Coastal Na
vigation standard and the ce
rtification will be noted
in the candidates Sail Canada Logbook. Certification is complete when the logbook is signed by the evaluating
instructor(s) and a seal affi
xed, and when the candidate status is updated in the Sail Canada data base. Student
certification is good for life.
Additional Notes
Students that have completed Basic Coastal Navigation may further develop their skills by taking the Sail Can-
ada Intermediate Coastal Navigation or Intermediate Cruising course.
Over time student skills may weaken and updates to training to refresh and build skill are recommended.
Physical Requirements for Candidates
None.
Further Information
For further information on navigation training contact your Provincial Sailing Association or Sail Canada.
 
Effective Date: March 31, 2017
 
Sail Canada
Cruising and Power Standards
 
Basic Coastal Navigation Standard
©
Sail Canada 2017
BASIC COASTAL NAVIGATION STANDARD
Course Description
This introductory course offers basic knowledge of navigation theory and is the initial course in a
comprehensive set of courses offered by Sail Canada on vessel navigation. The curriculum covers the role of the navigator and introduces the publications, aids to navigation, tools and techniques that support planning and safe passage making. The student is exposed to basic plotting and position determination methods. This course covers information key to the effective use of electronics.

Sessions complement material introduced in Sail Canada Basic Cruising and Basic Powerboating courses.
 
The concepts and skills covered will be applied in the Intermediate Cruising and Intermediate Power courses and prepares candidates for the Sail Canada Intermediate Coastal Navigation courses.
This course should be offered and evaluated in not less than 15 hours of classroom sessions.

Objective
To be able to plan and to safely navigate by day in Canadian coastal and inland local waters.

Prerequisites
None.
PCOC Recommended.
Ashore Knowledge
The candidate must be able to:
1. Describe the navigator’s role and responsibilities including appraisal, planning, execution and monitoring
position.
2. Explain the chart symbols and conventions on Canadian Hydrographic charts, in accordance with the
terminology of Chart 1, Symbols, Abbreviations and Terms.
3. Identify a source of official Canadian government navigation publications.
4. List the publications required for prudent navigation in the local area and demonstrate their purpose, in-
cluding the following minimum requirements:
a) Large scale charts of the area and Chart 1, Symbols, Abbreviations and Terms;
b) Sailing Directions;
c) Tide and Current Tables;
d) Current Atlas;
e) Collision Regulations;
f)  Local rules and regulations;
g) List of Lights, Buoys, and Fog Signals;
h) Radio Aids to Marine Navigation;
i)  Safe Boating Guide;
j)  Canadian Aids to Navigation.
5. Describe source and purpose of Notices to Mariners and Notices to Shipping.
6. List and describe or demonstrate the use of tools required for prudent navigation including:
a) Hand-bearing compass;
b) Steering compass and deviation table;
c) Depth sounder and lead line;
d) Log/knot-meter;
e) Dividers;
f) Protractor, plotter or parallel rule;
g) Watch or clock;
h) Pencil/eraser/note book.
7. List factors affecting depth above or below chart datum in tidal and non-tidal waters.
8.
Use the
Tide and Current Table, Current Atlas
or chart embedded tables to find:
a)
Times and heights of tides at reference and secondary ports;
b)
Direction and rate of current at
reference and secondary stations;
c)
Rate and direction of current at a specific location using tidal diamonds.or a Current Atlas.
9.
Convert courses, headings and bearings between true, magnetic, and compass.
10.
Plot:
a)
A dead reckoning (DR) position from a kn
own position given speed, time, and course;
b)
A position fix based on two or more bearings on different terrestrial objects taken at one time;
c)
A position fix based on one bearing and a tran
sit range based on terrestrial objects;
d)
Danger and clearing bearings.
11.
Given one or more planned legs and estimated speed, determine to the nearest minute:
a)
Estimated time of arrival (ETA);
b)
Revised ETA.
12.
Recognize day and night appearance and meaning of the Canadian Aids to Navigation System (lat-
eral, cardinal, special
buoys; and daybeacons).
13.
Use charts and publications to prepare a basic
pilotage plan for a daytime trip including:
a)
Harbour entry and exit;
b)
Waypoints, rhumb line course, heading (in compass), distance, and ETA;
c)
Use of aids to navigation enroute;
d)
Consideration of water depth,
current, weather, and othe
r local factors and hazards.
14.
With reference to GPS:
a)
Explain the basic operation of GPS to determine position;
b)
List factors that affect the accuracy of positions given by GPS;
c)
Identify common GPS applications for navigation and cautions concerning their usage.
15.
Describe the types of information that may be included in a vessels log.
16.
Use Sail Canada Uniform Navigation Symbols and Terms for plotting and labelling.
`
Outcomes and Evaluation
You can attain this standard by achieving a minimum of 70% on the Sail Canada Basic Coastal Navigation
Examination. Performance on the written exam will be reviewed with the candidate.
Successful candidates will be awarded the Basic Coastal Na
vigation standard and the ce
rtification will be noted
in the candidates Sail Canada Logbook. Certification is complete when the logbook is signed by the evaluating
instructor(s) and a seal affi
xed, and when the candidate status is updated in the Sail Canada data base. Student
certification is good for life.
Additional Notes
Students that have completed Basic Coastal Navigation may further develop their skills by taking the Sail Can-
ada Intermediate Coastal Navigation or Intermediate Cruising course.
Over time student skills may weaken and updates to training to refresh and build skill are recommended.
Physical Requirements for Candidates
None.
Further Information
For further information on navigation training contact your Provincial Sailing Association or Sail Canada.
 

 

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